Open Access
Issue
MATEC Web Conf.
Volume 149, 2018
2nd International Congress on Materials & Structural Stability (CMSS-2017)
Article Number 01014
Number of page(s) 8
Section Session 1 : Materials & Pathologies
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/matecconf/201814901014
Published online 14 February 2018
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